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Key parts of an old kitchen range - annotated drawing and large photo

Based on my mother's recollections and discussions with people who remember their parents or grandparents cooking on a kitchen range.

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Kitchen ranges, also known as 'kitcheners', were what everyone cooked on in Victorian and Edwardian times - unless of course they were still using the older open fire cooking. Some such ranges were still in use even after electric and gas ovens became available, and a large number have survived in museums and stately homes.

Later ranges

Later range designs incorporated a 'back boiler' which provided hot water on tap. These, however, could explode if pipework became blocked - and frozen water in pipes wasn't unusual!

Albert Smith

There were numerous sizes and shapes of ranges, depending on the manufacturer and the type of cooking required. Essentially, though, they all had the same main parts. The drawing below shows the main parts of a range suitable for a fairly large and comparatively well-off family. Further below is a photograph of a similar range.

Key to parts of the old Victorian or Edwardian coal-fired kitchen range, also known as a kitchener.

Key to parts of a kitchen range

See below for a photo of an actual range with its key parts.

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Photograph of a large range, showing all the key parts

Old Victorian or Edwardian coal-fired kitchen range, also known as a kitchener.

Victorian or Edwardian coal-fired kitchen range, also known as a kitchener. Photographed in Blaise Castle Museum.

  

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